#title#

my sins are more feculent than this wall...

Sexy Lamp song by Thundering Asteroids

kellysue:

Sexy Lamp Page one. Panel one.
All the tropes are getting held up.
My breasts or my backstory,
Let’s see which is more developed. I’m the character you’re writing.
The only one that’s female.
I feel like Smurfette.
I guess that makes you Gargamel. Don’t fridge me, bro.
I’m not a plot device…

(Source: thunderingasteroids.com)

lacigreen:

alltsar:

to everyone saying “what has happened to our world”

sad reality.

lacigreen:

alltsar:

to everyone saying “what has happened to our world”

sad reality.

'ODY-C' creators hit a Homer switching up epic tale

fantasticgirlreadscomics:

In tackling a gender-bent, psychedelically sci-fi version of Homer’s epic poem The Odyssey, comic-book writer Matt Fraction wanted a fittingly epic beginning. That is, until he learned that a 10-page foldout spread would break the presses.

An eight-pager, though? Totally doable.

The more I read about ODY-C the more I become absolutely certain that I am going to fall deeply in love with this book!

At the risk of turning this into more of a Matt Fraction appreciation blog than it already is, I have to talk about ODY-C again. We recently got the new Image Comics preview book at our store, so of course I immediately flipped through it. When I got to the pages for ODY-C I was actually unable to verbally express how beautiful they were. All I could do was stand there and stare at the splash of colors, the incredible design, and the intricate layouts. These preview pages are so beautiful, I can barely stand them! Christian Ward is an insanely talented artist and after seeing his character sketches at Image Expo I was prepared for the art to be gorgeous.


I wasn’t prepared for how emotional I got when I read those first pages of clearly classically inspired, epic narration full of female pronouns. It was one of those moments of being hit really hard by the realization that I’ve been missing something and then finally finding it. I actually felt something similar when I first read Suzie’s preteen search for sex ed, but that was more my adult desire to see an experience being represented. What’s happening here is somehow deeper. This is hitting me hard in the parts of me that are still a little girl reading Greek mythology, in particular devouring stories about clever Odysseus who solves his problems with his wits, and wishing I could more easily find myself in them. As a child I desperately wanted to see the story about the brainy hero who gets through adventures on smarts with a protagonist who reminded me more of myself. And as I read the first panel, here it was:

Clever Odyssia and her clever plan to win the war with Troia that had stretched across and entire century.

I don’t know yet whether or not I’m going to relate strongly to Fraction and Ward’s Odyssia (and as an adult I have much less interest in being compared to Odysseus), but even before its release ODY-C has started to fulfill a childhood dream that I hadn’t realized I was still holding onto.


Look, just click through to that article and look at the preview pages. Or stop by your LCS and see if they can show you the preview book in person. You’ll see for yourself. Of course if our store is the one you stop by, I’m more likely to make an awkward growling noise than say any of this because UNF, that art! But yeah. This book.

November can’t come soon enough!

Looks intriguing…

(via kellysue)

scaredystark:

we-other-victorians:

Victorian Prostitutes: Not All Of Them Were Seduced-And-Abandoned
I promised a forthcoming post about Victorian prostitutes who didn’t fit the contemporary stereotype of the “fallen woman,” and here it is. I stumbled on some fascinating articles while trying to find the full text of a letter from a prostitute to the Times in 1858, and found it here at The Naked Anthropologist. They’ve helpfully bolded and highlighted the vital parts of the text, which is itself a response to a previous letter in which the author detailed her proper upbringing and her fall from grace when she was forced into the sex trade. By contrast, this letter-writer tells of her working-class childhood, her start as a prostitute at the age of 15, and her happiness overall at being able to make an independent living and support herself through her own work. She calls out the hypocrisy of reformers in what remains, 150 years later, an epic smackdown for the ages:

You railers of the Society for the Suppression of Vice, you the pious, the moral, the respectable, as you call yourselves, who stand on your smooth and pleasant side of the great gulf you have dug and keep between yourselves and the dregs, why don’t you bridge it over, or fill it up, and by some humane and generous process absorb us into your leavened mass, until we become interpenetrated with goodness like yourselves? What have we to be ashamed of, we who do not know what shame is—the shame you mean?
I conduct myself prudently, and defy you and your policemen too. Why stand you there mouthing with sleek face about morality? What is morality? Will you make us responsible for what we never knew? Teach us what is right and tutor us in what is good before you punish us for doing wrong. We who are the real prostitutes of the true natural growth of society, and no impostors, will not be judged by ‘One more unfortunate’, nor measured by any standard of her setting up. 

I really can’t recommend reading the full letter enough, because it so far predates the modern movement for sex workers’ rights, but it hits so many of the movement’s high points. The twisted, holier-than-thou morality of reformers still plagues so many philanthropic pushes today that this should be required reading for anybody who wants to go into charity work in which they will be helping someone less privileged than him/herself. File this one away under “secret weapon any time someone calls the Victorian era backwards.”
It turns out that the letter caused a stir all the way up the social ladder; Charles Dickens (who was known for his reform efforts with prostitutes) was called upon by Angela Burdett-Coutts, a middle class woman who ran a home for reforming fallen women, to find out the letter writer’s identity and help her. Apparently Dickens didn’t read too far into her letter, or he would have known that she really didn’t care to be rescued. He wrote a letter to the editor of the Times, and when he finished reading the letter, hastily dashed off a second one, retracting his inquiry after the author’s identity:

It seems that when Miss Coutts spoke to me about the letter, it had just attracted her notice and she had not read it through. It further appears that she is immensely staggered and disconcerted by the latter part of it, and is even troubled by its being seen by the people in her household. Therefore I think the writer had best remain unknown to her.

via The Telegraph
The Naked Anthropologist (obviously my new favorite blog) discusses this incident, as well as the use of the “fallen woman” imagery in reform campaigns of the time here. The women were often shown physically on the ground, twisting and gazing upward, desperate for help. And obviously, one prostitute’s story does not diminish or negate another’s; women were forced into prostitution, or maliciously seduced by men and then coerced into brothels once they realized their “honor” had been damaged. But on the whole, when a narrative feels too ubiquitous, it probably is. Look for the dissenters and the exceptions to the rule; they are always more difficult to hear above the din of the majority, but they are telling their stories to the world through one channel or another. Especially for those looking to do philanthropic work of any kind, look for people who don’t want your help and ask why. Benevolence that does not accept a refusal of help is no benevolence at all.
Above, Odalisque by Hippolyte Arnoux, 1880(Arnoux was a French photographer who took pictures of European women posed in Orientalist settings and costumes)

curliestofcrowns

scaredystark:

we-other-victorians:

Victorian Prostitutes: Not All Of Them Were Seduced-And-Abandoned

I promised a forthcoming post about Victorian prostitutes who didn’t fit the contemporary stereotype of the “fallen woman,” and here it is. I stumbled on some fascinating articles while trying to find the full text of a letter from a prostitute to the Times in 1858, and found it here at The Naked Anthropologist. They’ve helpfully bolded and highlighted the vital parts of the text, which is itself a response to a previous letter in which the author detailed her proper upbringing and her fall from grace when she was forced into the sex trade. By contrast, this letter-writer tells of her working-class childhood, her start as a prostitute at the age of 15, and her happiness overall at being able to make an independent living and support herself through her own work. She calls out the hypocrisy of reformers in what remains, 150 years later, an epic smackdown for the ages:

You railers of the Society for the Suppression of Vice, you the pious, the moral, the respectable, as you call yourselves, who stand on your smooth and pleasant side of the great gulf you have dug and keep between yourselves and the dregs, why don’t you bridge it over, or fill it up, and by some humane and generous process absorb us into your leavened mass, until we become interpenetrated with goodness like yourselves? What have we to be ashamed of, we who do not know what shame is—the shame you mean?

I conduct myself prudently, and defy you and your policemen too. Why stand you there mouthing with sleek face about morality? What is morality? Will you make us responsible for what we never knew? Teach us what is right and tutor us in what is good before you punish us for doing wrong. We who are the real prostitutes of the true natural growth of society, and no impostors, will not be judged by ‘One more unfortunate’, nor measured by any standard of her setting up. 

I really can’t recommend reading the full letter enough, because it so far predates the modern movement for sex workers’ rights, but it hits so many of the movement’s high points. The twisted, holier-than-thou morality of reformers still plagues so many philanthropic pushes today that this should be required reading for anybody who wants to go into charity work in which they will be helping someone less privileged than him/herself. File this one away under “secret weapon any time someone calls the Victorian era backwards.”

It turns out that the letter caused a stir all the way up the social ladder; Charles Dickens (who was known for his reform efforts with prostitutes) was called upon by Angela Burdett-Coutts, a middle class woman who ran a home for reforming fallen women, to find out the letter writer’s identity and help her. Apparently Dickens didn’t read too far into her letter, or he would have known that she really didn’t care to be rescued. He wrote a letter to the editor of the Times, and when he finished reading the letter, hastily dashed off a second one, retracting his inquiry after the author’s identity:

It seems that when Miss Coutts spoke to me about the letter, it had just attracted her notice and she had not read it through. It further appears that she is immensely staggered and disconcerted by the latter part of it, and is even troubled by its being seen by the people in her household. Therefore I think the writer had best remain unknown to her.

via The Telegraph

The Naked Anthropologist (obviously my new favorite blog) discusses this incident, as well as the use of the “fallen woman” imagery in reform campaigns of the time here. The women were often shown physically on the ground, twisting and gazing upward, desperate for help. And obviously, one prostitute’s story does not diminish or negate another’s; women were forced into prostitution, or maliciously seduced by men and then coerced into brothels once they realized their “honor” had been damaged. But on the whole, when a narrative feels too ubiquitous, it probably is. Look for the dissenters and the exceptions to the rule; they are always more difficult to hear above the din of the majority, but they are telling their stories to the world through one channel or another. Especially for those looking to do philanthropic work of any kind, look for people who don’t want your help and ask why. Benevolence that does not accept a refusal of help is no benevolence at all.

Above, Odalisque by Hippolyte Arnoux, 1880
(Arnoux was a French photographer who took pictures of European women posed in Orientalist settings and costumes)

curliestofcrowns

(via lostinhistory)

lizdexia:

I’ve always thought this design from a Hungarian jousting targe on display at the Met would make an amazing tattoo. The text translates to “Though I am hated by all birds, I nevertheless rather enjoy that,” which is basically the coolest way of saying “Haters gonna hate” that I can imagine.

lizdexia:

I’ve always thought this design from a Hungarian jousting targe on display at the Met would make an amazing tattoo. The text translates to “Though I am hated by all birds, I nevertheless rather enjoy that,” which is basically the coolest way of saying “Haters gonna hate” that I can imagine.

(Source: jonahryan, via lostinhistory)

‘Men get raped and molested,’ should be a whole sentence. If you have to tack on the word ‘too,’ then you’re using the experience of male victims to silence females instead of giving them their own space.

(via goldenphoenixgirl)

Not sure if I’ve reblogged this before but it always bears repeating.

(via thebicker)

(Source: theresalwaysalwayssomething, via fuckyesfeminist)

sunvapor asked: What the fucks happening in Ferguson?

clehmentine:

Alright, i’m gonna sit down and basically explain the situation in this ask so everyone of my followers knows why i’m so pissed.

Michael Brown, a 17 - 18 year old african american boy was unlawfully shot (8-10 times supposedly) by police in St Louis, Missouri on saturday, august 9th, 2014. He was unarmed, and had done nothing to attract suspicion other than the fact that he was black. His body was left in the street for 4 hours. (EDIT: i’ve discovered that the Brown family wishes for any and all photos of Michael lying in the streets to be removed. please respect this and do so)

There are several claims from witnesses (see: Dorian Johnson’s account and video [HIGHLY RECOMMEND READING UP ON HIS ACCOUNT, ITS VERY SPECIFIC] — Brown’s friend who experienced the situation first hand, La’Toya Cash and Phillip Walker— Ferguson residents nearby the incident),  that fall together in generally close claims. However, the only one who’s claim seems out of place is the police officer’s who shot Brown. Who, by the way, is put off on paid administrative leave AND who’s name remained under anonymity for his safety (However, attorney Benjamin Crump is looking for a way to force release his name). He claims that Brown began to wrestle the officer for his gun and tried attacking him after he told Brown and his friend Dorian Johnson (22) to “get the f*ck on the sidewalk”.

According to Johnson, after a minor confrontation on the officer’s part where he grabbed Brown by the neck and then by the shirt, the officer pulled his gun on Brown and shot him at point blank range on the right side of his body. Brown and Johnson were able to get away briefly and started running. However, Brown was shot in the back, supposedly disabling him from getting very far. He turned around with his arms in the air and said “I don’t have a gun, stop shooting!” By this point, Brown and the officer were face to face as the cop shot him several times in the face and chest until he was finally dead. Johnson ran to his apartment and by the sound of his account, seemingly had some sort of panic attack. Later he emerged from his home to see Brown still laying in the streets. People were gathered with their cellphones, screaming at the police.

According to msnbc, the police refuse to interview Johnson at all, despite his amazing courage to come forward. They didn’t wanna hear it. They only listened to the cop’s account of it all and were vague with the media on what they thought happened. They’ve also refused to commit to a timeline in releasing autopsy results and other investigation information.

Numerous rumors are sweeping around such as Brown stealing candy from a QuickTrip, the store he emerged from calling the cops on him, Brown reaching for a gun, Brown attacking the cop first, ect. But these have all been debunked. (I know a lot of these have been debunked, but im having a hard time finding sources. if anyone could help out and link some legit ones id be SO grateful)

The event in and of itself was terrible, but now it has escalated beyond belief. Around 100 or more people, mostly black, went to the police station to protest peacefully. Things quickly turned bad as martial law got involved and authorities were bringing in K9s, tanks, heavy artillery, ect. The heavy police presence only made things worse as riots began to break out and looting and vandalism started. [ x ] [ x ] [ x ]

Now, as of very recently, the media has been banned from Ferguson. There is also a No-Fly zone above Ferguson for the reason of “ TO PROVIDE A SAFE ENVIRONMENT FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES ” as said on the Federal Aviation Commission’s website. Cop cars are lined up on the borders to prevent people from entering/leaving. Media outlets are being threatened with arrest. It completely violates our amendments and everything.

It’s becoming increasingly scary and difficult to find out whats going on over there. I’m afraid this is all the information I have, though. If anybody else knows anything about the situation, please feel free to add on or correct any mistakes i’ve made as i’m no expert on writing these things.

And as a personal favor, i’d really appreciate anyone to give this a reblog in order to spread the word. I think it’s a shame that this is going on in our own country yet so few people know about it. Help me make this topic huge and get this as much attention as possible.

What the Fuck America. Seriously, WTF.